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Saturday, 9 November 2013

Morning Walk At Venus Drive (09 Nov 2013)

The weather was surprisingly dry even though the weather forecasted to be rainy. Making use of the dry but overcast weather, I decided to go to Venus Drive for a walk. I am also taking this trip as as a practice trip to get use to my Tamron 70-300 mm telephoto cum macro lens, and also testing out my DIY flash diffuser.


The first beetle that came into view was this 2mm Fungus Beetle. I took a number of shots to get use the new lens.


Near to the tiny Fungus Beetle was a small (~3 mm) Silken Fungus Beetle (Triplax rufipes). I was rather disappointed with the DIY diffuser as there was still an obvious reflection from the shiny elytra of the beetle.


Moving down the path, I found this lovely Fungus Beetle (Stenotarsus pardalis). I always like to photograph this beetle because of its vibrant red color.


Along the side of the path there was a fallen tree. On the fallen tree I found a few Tiger Beetles. Owning to the reason that there was a water obstacle between me and the log, I decided to use the telephoto zoom of my lens to take photographs of this beetle.


As I was moving down the path, a small beetle flew across my path and landed very near to me. Although the telephoto zoom allowed photograph of the insects from a distance away, I still prefer taking close up macro even though there is a high risk that the beetle would fly away without me taking any photograph,


Coming to a tall buttress rooted tree, I found this lovely colored Fungus Beetle. This beetle is about 2 mm in size.


Among some dead plants was a small (~5 mm) Fungus Weevil Beetle. This beetle wtas easily spooked and hence I switched from macro to telephoto zoom mode.


Flying among some low bushes were several Tumbling Leaf Beetle (Glipa malaccana). This beetle was hyper sensitive to motions and flew around restlessly. Fortunately I was able to photograph it while it was taking a rest.


In a patch of low vegetation, a Leaf Beetle was seen flying among the low vegetation.


Moving on I came across a 1 mm beetle hiding under a large Elephant Ear Taro (Alocasia macrorrhizos) leaf. This is a first-time-encountered beetle.


Moving further down the path, a 8 mm Net-winged Beetle was seen resting on a leaf. Pardon the "strange" color as I don't know what happen to this particular photograph in that the color looked washed out. The black on this photograph turned to brown for some unknown reasons. I have redo several of the same photograph but to no avail.


Coming to a dead tree stump, several of this Fungus Beetle was seen on it. This is interesting as these are nocturnal insects.


The highlight of the day was the encounter with this first-time-encountered Chafer Beetle.


Next a brightly colored Net-winged Beetle (Dictyoptera aurora) appeared on some low bushes. The red color of this beetle is so intense!


Almost near the exit, a 5 mm Tumbling Flower Beetle was seen having a great time drinking sky juice.


Next to the Tumbling Flower Beetle was a Leaf Beetle (Argopus brevis). This photograph was taken with the 300 mm telephoto lens.


A small (~10 mm) reddish-black colored beetle flew cross my path and landed on a leaf. Upon closer look, it turned out to be a Net-winged Beetle. This is slightly smaller than the Dictyoptera aurora Net-winged Beetle. After looking closer at this photograph I discovered that I may have wrongly identified this beetle as Dictyoptera aurora Net-winged Beetle in my past posting.


The trip was surprisingly successful as I was not expecting to be able to take some nice photograph since I was still getting use to the new Tamron camera lens.