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Saturday, 15 September 2018

Night Walk At Riffle Range Trail (14 Sep 2018)

It has been a long while that I last went to Riffle Range Road for my night macro photography session, so I decided to go there for this week's session. Here's a photograph of a lovely Orange Leafhopper (Bothrogonia addita) which seemed to in abundance at the place.


The first beetle of the trip was a pleasant surprise - a Long Horned Beetle (Aeolesthes holosericeus) which I have not come across for a long while.


Near to the Long Horned Beetle was a small fallen log where this small 4 mm Ground Beetle (Pericalus tetrastigma) was running about on it.


As I walked along the Riffle Range Trail, I was greatly disappointed by the sights of the invasive Air Potato plants. Much of the trail were covered by the plant and many of the original vegetation were strangled or overtaken by the plant. From my past trips, I didn't find any critters feeding on it and neither did I find any beetles on them.

Here's a photograph of a leaf of an Air Potato plant. The Air Potato plants here were huge. I have placed a Singapore 1 dollar coin on the leaf to show its size. Sadly, many of the Air Potato plants here are of the same size as that in the photograph. Hoped NParks would do something about the Air Potato plants invasion in our nature parks.


Near to Ground Beetle was a small tree where this 5 mm Darkling Beetle was found.


Moving on, I was thrilled to find this 5 mm Hister Beetle. I rarely come across Hister Beetles on my many years of macro photography.


Coming to a patch of ginger plants, I was excited to find this first-time-encountered Ground Beetle.


There were many fallen trees at the place, and some of them were really huge. Interestingly, most of them were without critters, let alone beetles. As I scan through the various fallen trees, I was glad to find this two 1 mm Darkling Beetles on one of the fallen trees.


On the same tree was this 5 mm Fungus Beetle.


More walking without finding any beetles until I came to a small tree where this 3 mm Darkling Beetle was found.


On another tree nearby was this 12 mm first-time-encountered Darkling Beetle (Amarygmus metallicus). I particularly like the bronze coloration of its elytra.


More walking before finding this 3 mm Checkered Beetle resting on a small tree.


At the base of the tree was this Chafer Beetle resting on a dried leaf.


The last beetle for the trip was a Fungus Weevil (Stiboderes impressus) on a large fallen tree.


The number of beetles encountered on this trip was below expectation. Nevertheless, I am glad to be able to find two first-time-encountered beetles on this trip.

Saturday, 1 September 2018

Night Walk At Admiralty Park (31 Aug 2018)

It has been more than 3 years that I last went to Admiralty Park. One of the main reasons for not going there was because of the red ants infestation (Morning Walk At Admiralty Park (21 Mar 2015)).

I happened to be on leave and so decided to go there for a walk since it is not so convenient for me to go there on a working day. Although it rained in the early afternoon, I decided to continue with my plan. Here's an interesting looking caterpillar encountered at the place.


As expected, the vegetation at the place were drenching wet, and so was my hope of finding any beetles for the trip. It was after a long while of walking before I came across this 5 mm Fungus Weevil (Eucorynus crassicornis) on a small tree. I am quite surprised to find it on a healthy tree as I usually find them on rotten logs or dying trees.


On another tree nearby was this small 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


More walking before finding this lone Chafer Beetle (Apogonia expeditionis) feasting on a leaf.


The highlight of the trip was the encounter with this lone 12 mm Tortoise-shell Beetle (Aspidimorpha miliaris) hiding under a leaf.


More walking without finding any beetles until coming to a small tree with this small 2 mm Darkling Beetle.


On the same tree was another 5 mm Darkling Beetle.


Moving further, I am happy to find this 4 mm Leaf Beetle on a  Clidemia hirta plant.


On a tree nearby was a 4 mm Darkling Beetle.


I was almost nearing the entrance to the park, when this Chafer Beetle was found on a low bush. At a cursory glance, the beetle looked like the Apogonia expeditionis  Chafer Beetle but upon closer look its body is much broader and flatter than that of the Apogonia expeditionis.


Although there were many fallen logs along the trail, majority of them do not have any critters on them. Coming to a fallen log near the entrance, I was thrilled to find this 20 mm False Click Beetle.


The last beetle for the trip was a pair of commonly encountered Chafer Beetle.


Although the weather was not ideal but I am glad that to still be able to find a number of beetles, especially the Tortoise-shell Beetle. Sadly, the place is still infested with the small red ants despite the place having undergone a massive renovation.

Saturday, 25 August 2018

Night Walk At Windsor Nature Park (24 Aug 2018)

There was a heavy thunder storm in the morning and the weather throughout the day has been overcast. As I was looking forward to the macro photography session for the whole week, I decided to proceed with the plan and went to Windsor Nature Park.

Instead of the usual route that I take, I decided to go around the edge of the Windsor Nature Park and see if there are anything interesting. As expected all the vegetation at the place were drenching wet, so the chance of finding beetles was expected to be low. Here's a photograph of a commonly encountered Common Four Ring butterfly (Ypthima huebneri).


The first beetle of the trip was a small 1 mm Darkling Beetle found on a small tree near to the carpark.


Near to the 1 mm Darkling Beetle was another 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


Further down the rows of small trees that lined the carpark was this 2 mm Darkling Beetle resting on a small tree..


Coming to a patch of Bamboo Orchid (Arundina graminifolia), I was glad to be able to find several of this Orchid Beetle (Lema pectoralis) feasting on the Bamboo Orchid flower. From the look of the flowers, it is not hard to understand why many beetles are considered a pest. Notwithstanding this fact, it is still one of my favorite beetles found in Singapore.


The surprise find for the night was this diurnal Leaf Beetle (Hoplosaenidea singaporensis) out in the open. It has been a while I last encountered it.


There is a tarred walking path that fringed the Windsor Nature Park and so for the night, my plan was to explore both sides of the path for beetles. To my pleasant surprise, I managed to find several of this Tiger Beetle (Cicindela aurulenta) around a muddy patch next to the path.


Near to the Tiger Beetle was a 3 mm Fungus Weevil (Habrissus omadioides) at the base of a small tree.


Near to the Fungus Weevil was a lone 10 mm Darkling Beetle (Ceropria induta) on a fallen log.


On another fallen log nearby was another 15 mm Darkling Beetle.


The vegetation along side the path consists mainly of tall grass bushes and small trees on the side of Windsor Nature Park, and the other side of the path is mainly lined with the Leea rubra plant. Here's a commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Adoretus compressus) found on the "wilder" side of the path.


A stone's throw away was another Chafer Beetle.


Coming to a spot where there were several fallen logs and on a low bush next to them was this 10 mm first-time-encountered Long Horned Beetle.


On one of the logs was a pair of 2 mm Darklng Beetles.


On the same log was this 1 mm Darkling Beetle.


On another fallen log was this 10 mm commonly encountered Darkling Beetle.


On the last fallen log at the spot was this 4 mm Sap Beetle, busily feasting on the black fungus that it was on.


It was after a while of walking before coming across this 8 mm Fungus Beetle (Eumorphus tetrapilotus) on a low bush.


Some more walking before finding several of this Leaf Beetle (Hemipyxis semiviridis) on a tapioca plant.


It was time to turn back and on the way back there were several of this commonly encountered brown Chafer Beetles found on the Leea rubra plants by the side of the path.


The last beetle for the trip was another commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Apogonia expeditionis) found feasting on the Leea rubra flowers.


Although the number of beetles found on this trip was relatively small compared to previous trips to the place, it is still considered to be a fruitful one given the super wet weather. Indeed Windsor Nature Park is one of my favorite places to visit for finding beetles.

Saturday, 18 August 2018

Night Walk At MacRitchie Reservoir Park (17 Aug 2018)

It has been many months since I last went to MacRitchie Reservoir Park and so I decided to go there for a walk. The weather has been very hot and dry for the entire week, so I am mentally prepared to find very few beetles on this trip. Nevertheless I proceeded with the trip.

The place as expected was bone dry and not many critters were out. Here's a photograph of a diurnal butterfly (Mycalesis mineus macromalayana) resting on a leaf.


The first beetle for the trip was a commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Adoretus compressus) munching on a leaf.


A short distance from the Adoretus compressus Chafer Beetle was another Chafer Beetle.


As expected, it was only after walking for a while before I found this small 5 mm Darkling Beetle on a small tree.


It was another long while of walking before finding this 3 mm Fungus Weevil on a small tree.


On the same tree were several beetle larvae, all under a thin layer of web.


A stone's throw away was another small tree where this Darkling Beetle (Strongylium sp.) was found.


After a long while of walking without finding any beetle, I was about to turn back. Just then I came by a small tree where this interesting looking 5 mm Straight-snouted Weevil (Family Brentidae) was found.


On the same tree was this 10 mm Long Horned Beetle (Nedine adversa).


Still on the same tree, a 12 mm Fungus Weevil was resting at the base of the tree.


Several centimeters away from the Fungus Weevil was this smaller 5 mm Fungus Weevil.


Further up the same tree was this 1 mm Fungus Weevil.


On another side of the tree was a 5 mm first-time-encountered Checkered Beetle.


At the base of the tree was this Ambrosia Beetle digging into the tree. This is a sure sign that the tree is dying, which explain why I found so many beetles on this particular tree.


Just before I call it a day and turn back, I decided to check out a small fallen log where this Darkling Beetle (Ceropria superba) was found.


Near to the Darkling Beetle was a first-time-encountered Pleasing Fungus Beetle. At a cursory glance, it looked like the Triplatoma gestroi Pleasing Fungus Beetle, but upon closer examination of the pattern on its pronotum, the pattern is different from that of the Triplatoma gestroi Pleasing Fungus Beetle.


At the turn back point, I found this 4 mm Martinezostes sp. beetle, looking like a small ball.


On the return route, I found this 5 mm Darkling Beetle (Strongylium tenuipes) on a small tree.


On the same tree was this 1 mm active Fungus Beetle, moving about the tree. Pardon the badly taken photograph as I was in a hurry to catch it before it went further up the tree.


Nearing the exit was a large bush of Singapore Rhododendron (Melastoma malabathricum) plant where several of this commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Apogonia expeditionis) was found.


The last beetle for the trip was another commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Aprosterna pallide) feasting on a Singapore Rhododendron flower.


This trip was surprisingly fruitful, especially given the dry and hot weather. I am also glad to be able to find two first-time-encountered beetles.