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Friday, 11 January 2019

Flew In Visitors (12 Jan 2019)

The weather was fine for the past one week but sadly I was feeling under the weather and hence I decided to give this week's night macro session a  miss. While I was resting, a Chafer Beetle (Anomala variegata) flew into my house. This triggered me to pick up from where I last left on the "Flew In Visitors" post.

Here's a commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Apogonia expeditionis) found along the corridor of my house.



The next beetle was found belly up at the lift lobby. It is one of the few attractively colored Chafer Beetle (Anomala albopilsoa) that can be found in Singapore.



The next beetle was a first-time-encounter 3 mm Ground Beetle that landed on me in my study room. It was a pleasant surprise to find a fly-in Ground Beetle.



The last beetle for this round of "fly-in" was a Chafer Beetle (Anomala variegata) that triggered this post.



As like previous posts, I am confident that there will be more "fly-in" in the days to come.  

Saturday, 29 December 2018

Night Walk At Windsor Nature Park (28 Dec 2018)

The weather for the past few days have been hot and dry, so HW and I decided to go to Windsor Nature Park as the place has a higher chance of finding beetles regardless of whether it is dry or wet. The place looked bone dry as expected and we are not expecting too much from this trip.

Here's a photograph of a rather short and fat terrestrial flat worm (~25 mm) compared to the long and thin ones that we often encounter.


The first beetle for the trip was a 3 mm Toe-winged Beetle found on the Elephant Ear Plant that I usually photograph the Ant-like Flower Beetles. Interestingly, not a single Ant-like Flower Beetle was found on the plant this time round.


Near to the Toe-winged Beetle was a small tree where this 2 mm Darkling Beetle was found.


Further down the trail was a fallen log where several of this Rove Beetles were found running around the Bracket Fungus growing on the log.


On the same fallen log was a Fungus Beetle (Triplatoma gestroi) hiding in a crevice in the log.


Several centimeters away was a 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


On a tree next to the fallen log was a small tree where this 1 mm Darkling Beetle was found. I always like to photograph these 1 mm beetles as they would always appear as black dots when seen by the naked eyes, but colors and patterns started to appear when you zoom in with the camera.


Another 5 mm Darkling Beetle found on the same tree.


Close by to the Darkling Beetle was a 1 mm Fungus Beetle.


Moving further, we came across another fallen log where several of this 10 mm  Darkling Beetle (Ceropria superba) were found.


On another part of the fallen log was this lovely Ground Beetle (Catascopus dalbertisi).


Moving to another fallen log, this 10 mm Darking Beetle probably had seen better days given the punctured elytra.


On the same log was this 1 mm Darkling Beetle.


Still on the same log was this 20 mm Fungus Beetle.


There were not many critters along the sides of the trail, this was probably due to the dry weather. So it was only after searching for a while before I found this Ground Beetle (Onypterygia longispinis) hiding under a leaf.


Meters away was this metallic bronze color Chafer Beetle.


There were quite a number of "new" fallen trees since I last visited the place. On a "new" fallen tree was this 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


On the same tree was this 5 mm Darkling Beetle.


Nearby was this 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


Walking further HW came across a small tree with this beetle larva.


On a tree vine nearby was this 3 mm Darkling Beetle. This specimen looks similar to the earlier Darkling Beetle except for the band for this beetle is straight, as compared to the "bend" in the earlier beetle.


Further down the trail was a lone Tiger Beetle (Cicindela aurulenta). This is the most commonly encountered Tiger Beetle in our parks and nature reserves.


Near to the Tiger Beetle was a 20 mm Ground Beetle resting on a leaf.


The last beetle for the trip was a 3 mm Darkling Beetle, commonly found on small trees at night.


This trip has nothing to shout about, but given the not so ideal weather during this period of monsoon, the trip is still consider to be fruitful.


Friday, 30 November 2018

Night Walk At Pasir Ris Park (30 Nov 2018)

The weather today was surprisingly better than expected, with only some short showers through the day. HW and I planned to go to Pasir Ris Park for this week's macro photography session and so we proceeded there as planned. As expected, the condition of the place was not ideal with many part of the ground being "soggy" due to the heavy rain during the week.

Here's a photograph of some interesting looking 3 mm flies on a blade of grass.


As expected, the first beetle for the trip was the commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Apogonia expeditionis) feasting on some closed leaves. Due to the rain, even this commonly encountered beetle was only seen 3 times during this trip.


The vegetation grew back after all the construction works at the place that we usually visit. To my pleasant surprise, there were many of this 5 mm shiny bronze-color Leaf Beetle.


The highlight of the trip was the encounter of this first-time-encountered 3 mm beetle on a small blade of grass, while I was waiting for HW to reach the place. From its appearance, it looked like a Water Beetle. You might be wondering how can it be that a Water Beetle can be found on land? It is interesting to note that even the Water Beetle can fly and this is how they move from one body of water to another, especially during the dry season where their watery homes dried up frequently. Nevertheless, I may be wrong as this is only the second time that I encountered a Water Beetle on land since I started photographing Singapore's beetles since December 2012.


Further down the path was a spot where there were many Elephant Climber plants (Aniseia nervosus) and on one of the leaves was this lone 10 mm Tortoiseshell Beetle (Laccoptera nepalensis).


It was after a while of walking before we came to a sandy patch of ground where a colony of Tiger Beetle (Cicindela aurulenta) was found. There are easily a few tens of them resting close to each other.


On a small tree nearby was a 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


The last beetle for the trip was a 2 mm Darkling Beetle. Sadly, no more beetles encountered after this.


This trip was not very fruitful partially due to the wet weather and partially because we decided to go through a different path. Nevertheless, it is still a good trip as I managed to find a first-time-encountered beetle on this trip.

Sunday, 25 November 2018

Night Walk At Windsor Nature Park (23 Nov 2018)

Although it rained in the early afternoon, HW and I decided to proceed to Windsor Nature Park as planned. When we reached the place, we were rather disappointed as the vegetation looked like it just rained as all the vegetation were dripping wet with rain.

Here's an interesting terrestrial flat worm found during the trip.


Because of the wet vegetation, we decided to go straight into the Venus Loop trail. Near to the entrance were two Tiger Beetle (Cicindela aurulenta) resting on a leaf.


It was only after a while of walking before we came across a large fallen tree where several beetles were found. On top of the fallen tree was this 1 mm Darkling Beetle.


On the underside of the tree log was this 5 mm Darkling Beetle.


A short distance away from the Darkling Beetle was another Darkling Beetle (Ceropria superba).


At the far end of the tree log were several of this commonly encountered 10 mm Darkling Beetle.


On the drier part of the tree log were several of this 10 mm Fungus Beetles.


Dashing around the tree log were a number of this 5 mm Rove Beetle. This type of beetle has always been a challenge to photograph due to its speed and tendency to run away from light.


Together with the Rove Beetle were several of this 3 mm Rove Beetle.


A 20 mm Ground Beetle (Onypterygia longispinis) was found on the side of a small tree further down the trail.


On a small tree nearby was this 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


On a rotten tree stump were these two 5 mm beetles from the Ceratocanthidae family. I am so glad to be able to photograph this specimen moving about, as most of the time I only saw them rolled up into a ball.


On the side of the tree stump was this 5 mm Checkered Beetle. It has been a while I last encountered a Checkered Beetle.


Next to the tree stump was a fallen tree with several of this Fungus Beetle on  it.


Next to the Fungus Beetle was this 0.5 mm shiny critter. Not sure if it is a beetle.


Across the trail was another fallen tree where this interesting 5 mm Darkling Beetle was found.


Walking further down the trail, this 10 mm Fungus Weevil (Acroynus cylindricus) was found on a lichen of a small tree.


There was a newly fallen tree by the side of the trail and this 8 mm Darkling Beetle (Strongylium tenuipes) was found on it.


Next to the Darkling Beetle was this 1 mm Fungus Beetle.


On the same log was a 5 mm Darkling Beetle.


Time passes quickly and it was time to turn back, just then this Chafer Beetle was found on a low bush.


The last beetle for the trip was a bonus as it was found just immediately below the Chafer Beetle. It was a Long Horned Beetle (Aeolesthes holosericeus).


Although the place was very wet, the number of beetles encountered was still comparatively more than other locations. Indeed Windsor Nature Park is the place to look for beetles.