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Friday, 3 June 2016

Night Walk At Venus Drive (03 Jun 2016)

The weather has been wet for the past week, so my friend HW and I decided to go to Venus Drive to hopefully find some luminous mushrooms to photograph. The night was interesting in that we came across several interesting critters.

Here's a photograph of a 3 mm pseudo-scorpion which proved to be a challenge to photograph as it kept going into a small crevice near to it.


Another rarely encountered critter was this Lowland Dwarf Gecko (Hemiphyllodactylus typus) which slowly but steadily moved out of my camera focusing light.


The most interesting critter was this fly-like insect which congregated in large numbers on a single plant.


The first beetle for the trip was found on a small tree that lined the car park.


Coming to a large Elephant Ear plant, I am glad that we were able to find two of this small 4 mm Ant-like Flower Beetle (Anthelephila cyanea).


Near to the Ant-like Flower Beetle was a Chafer Beetle (Maladera orientalis) hiding among the Wild Pepper (Piper sarmentosum) plants that lined the side of the trail.


Coming to a small tree, I was surprised to find this lone Rove Beetle running about the side of the tree.


This period could possibly the emergence period for the Tiger Beetle (Cicindela aurulenta) as we found large number of them at Venus Drive and also at Pasir Ris Park.


Near to the Tiger Beetle was a large 12 mm Fungus Weevil on a leaf.


Near to the Fungus Weevil was a fallen rotting tree and on it was this 10 mm Darkling Beetle munching on some fungus growth.


Walking further down the trail, I was happy to find this small 3 mm beetle.


Several trees away, I was thrilled to find this lone 5 mm first-time-encountered Rove Beetle.


On another tree nearby was this small 2 mm Fungus Beetle.


Coming to a standing dead palm tree, I found this 6 mm Darkling Beetle high up the tree which gave me some good stretching.


While I was photographing the Darkling Beetle, HW called out to me to tell me that he found a beetle. Interestingly, this beetle looked like the Pectocera babai Click Beetle except that it does not have the fan-antennae of that of Pectocera babai Click Beetle. Not sure if it is a different beetle all together.


Further down the track was a woodpile where several of this Fungus Weevil (Eucorynus crassicornis) were seen moving on it.


On the same woodpile was this lovely Ground Beetle (Catascopis dalbertisi).


On a big tree nearby was this small 5 mm Fungus Weevil. Next to the Fungus Weevil was a really tiny beetle-like critter that I think could be some sort of mite.

On the same tree near to the Fungus Beetle was this 2 mm Darkling Beetle.


On another tree nearby was this 3 mm Darkling Beetle.


On the side of another small tree was this large 20 mm Ground Beetle which with a cursory glance looked very much like a cockroach.


On a patch of Singapore Rhododendron (Melastoma malabathricum) were several of this Leaf Beetle (Argopus brevis).


Next to the Leaf Beetle was a commonly encountered Chafer Beetle (Apogonia expeditionis).


Just centimeters away from the Chafer Beetle was another Chafer Beetle hiding under a leave.


Coming to another woodpile, I am glad to find this not-so-good looking Darkling Beetle (Ceropria induta) on it.


We were almost near to the turn-back point when this small 4 mm Fungus Weevil turned up on a small tree.


On the same tree with the Fungus Weevil was this beetle larvae. It is wonderful to still be able to find beetle larvae despite the not so ideal weather for the past weeks.


At the turn-back point was this small 4 mm Ground Beetle (Minuthodes multisetosa) on a small tree branch.


As we were making our way back, we chanced upon this lovely Darkling Beetle (Phymatosum rufonotatum) on the end of a broken tree branch.


The last beetle for the trip was a Ground Beetle resting on a leaf.


The trip was fruitful with more than 20 different beetles encountered, even though we didn't find the luminous mushroom that we were looking for.